AGM and Frank Tindall Lecture 2018

Frank Tindal Lecture 2018

This year our Commemorative Frank Tindall lecture will be given by Hugh Buchanan, the distinguished watercolourist. Hugh has chosen, as his subject: “Pastiche or Of its Time – an artistconsiders the state of contemporary architecture in an historic context.”

Having discussed with him, in advance of the lecture, his themes I have no doubt that we are in for an enjoyable and challenging evening. At a time when we are concerned about the quality of new building and places his choice of subject is most timely.

The lecture will take place in Haddington Town House on Wednesday 24 October immediately after a short AGM which will be held at 7.15pm. Refreshments will be served.

Members will be aware that over the last 15 years we have remembered Frank Tindall through the Memorial Lectures. The inaugural lecture was given by the late Charles McKean in which he described Haddington’s town form as a “fortress against the wind” – and last year David Sim delivered a widely praised lecture on the Human Scale in Architecture.

 

Blooming Haddington Win Gold 2018

Chairmans Blog September 2018

Chairmans Blog September 2018

After an amazing summer we suddenly feel the autumn closing in and it is time to update you on what has been happening in HADAS.

But first I must report, with sadness, the death of Andrew Gilmour who was a member of our committee for some years. Andrew lived in Gifford and was an architect. I knew him first because our sons, Alastair and Paul, were at school together and remain close friends, and then through working with him on the HADAS Committee.

Society Member Ben Tindall, one of Andrew’s students, writes:

I have very fond memories of Andrew.  As a tutor at the University of Edinburgh he stood out for the warmth of his interest in students, as well as his practical and down to earth guidance.  He did not stand for academic niceties or the fashionable dictates of magazine architecture.  Instead, as a product of Sir Robert Mathew’s Architectural Research Unit, he stood for humanity and common sense.  Against the advice of some other staff he encouraged me to apply for and take up the Penn Exchange Scholarship, for which I have always been grateful.  

We recognise these qualities through working with him. We send our thoughts to Ann, Alastair and James.

 

Picture of Hugh R Buchanan
Hugh Buchanan will deliver the 2018 Frank Tindall Lecture

Frank Tindal Lecture 2018

This year our Commemorative Frank Tindall lecture will be given by Hugh Buchanan, the distinguished watercolourist. Hugh has chosen, as his subject: “Pastiche or Of its Time – an artistconsiders the state of contemporary architecture in an historic context.”

Having discussed with him, in advance of the lecture, his themes I have no doubt that we are in for an enjoyable and challenging evening. At a time when we are concerned about the quality of new building and places his choice of subject is most timely.

The lecture will take place in Haddington Town House on Wednesday 24 October immediately after a short AGM which will be held at 7.15pm. Refreshments will be served.

Members will be aware that over the last 15 years we have remembered Frank Tindall through the Memorial Lectures. The inaugural lecture was given by the late Charles McKean in which he described Haddington’s town form as a “fortress against the wind” – and last year David Sim delivered a widely praised lecture on the Human Scale in Architecture.

 

Frank Tindall Plaque

Frank Tindall has been very much in our minds this year. Apart from the annual lecture we have been giving thought to a another way of remembering him. As the years pass we become increasingly aware of the relevance of the messages within his memoirs including the importance of community consolidation and also of ensuring that new development respects the essential character and  essence of its surroundings.

We plan to put in place a plaque on the west facing wall of 1 Bridge Street where Frank and his family lived in the early 1950’s.

 

Image of Plaque remembering Frank Tindall

 

Haddington 700 – Celebrating the 1318 Robert the Bruce Charter

As part of the year long Haddington 700 programme of events, I have been invited to speak at the conference “Charter, Church, Conflict and Community “1318-2018″”, organized by Haddington History Society and the East Lothian Antiquarians on Saturday 15 September at Haddington Town House.  My allotted subject is “Haddington Today” and I will be drawing on the principles which underpin Frank Tindall’s legacy. You can book tickets here, and you can find more Haddington 700 events here.

Blooming Haddington

St Marys, Haddington was the location of a very special event last Thursday. Representatives from all over Scotland gathered for the annual Beautiful Scotland Awards and Haddington was the overall winner in the Medium Town category – towns between 6-12,000 population. Haddington also won a Gold Standard Certificate.

This is a wonderful achievement by Blooming Haddington. The floral display this year has been superb. Going down town early morning for the paper I have often chatted with Rab Moran who is watering the hanging baskets and displays – a reminder of how much work goes into a success like this. Congratulations to all involved.

photo of blooming haddington celebrating winning a gold medal and best medium town 2018
Blooming Haddington wins Gold and Best Medium Town 2018

The Future of HADAS.

I shall be writing to members shortly to express our concerns regarding the future of HADAS. You will be aware from recent AGM’s and blogs that we are concerned that we are not getting new people on to the committee and we are rapidly reaching the point at which the absence of new blood threatens the viability of the Society. We will elaborate in the forthcoming letter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr L Lennie Haddington Shopfronts

Haddington’s Shopfronts – Dr Lindsay Lennie

Haddington’s Shopfronts

On Saturday 24th March Hadas members packed the Star Room in the John Gray Centre to hear a fascinating talk on Shopfronts by Dr Lindsay Lennie who gave us the benefit of her deep knowledge gained through completing a doctorate on shopfronts and a fellowship with Historic Environment Scotland. She was able to put Haddington in a national context quoting examples from Doune, Perth, Hawick, Edinburgh, Kelso, Dunkeld, Blairgowrie and Aberlour.

We learned that there is a lot more to the front of a shop than we had originally thought. Lindsay took us through the development of the shop from the early luckenbooths which replaced market stalls via Georgian, Victorian, Edwardian and later 20th Century shops to the present day. The development of manufacturing techniques to produce larger panes of glass and eventually plate glass was closely linked to the evolution of shop design. Cast iron from Scottish foundries such as Macfarlane could support plate glass and strengthen large display windows.

The various architectural features of a Victorian shopfront were explained including cornice, fascia, console bracket, fanlight, pilaster, plinth, lobby, and stallriser. There was a discussion on signage with good and bad examples and the talk ended with local examples from Haddington. The former shoe shop Barries, now Greigs the Baker, used to have a ‘golden boot’ drawing the attention of the potential purchaser. It was confirmed that the boot in question is now in a local museum. Main’s the Saddler retains the horse advertising the range of services offered to the riding community. Joe Forte Sports recently refurbished their premises and included a sign hanging outside. Dr Lennie pointed out that signs have a justifiable purpose in the marketing process but that too many signs would lead to clutter and detract from the street scene. Advertisements are controlled through planning law and it falls to  the Planning Authority to get the balance right.

This discussion seemed timely as proposals are being prepared for Haddington Town Centre.

Dr Lennie then led a group on a walkabout through the High Street, Market Street and Lodge Street. Many examples of interesting architectural details were pointed out, most of which were previously unknown to the group who passed them every day.  The tour finished with a look at the former Buttercup Dairy (of which there were 250 in Scotland) with its preserved tiles, mosaic lobby floor and original door and then the former Haddington Cooperative Society buildings in Lodge Street.

It was a thoroughly enjoyable morning and we will all be looking at traditional shopfronts with a new insight from now on.

David1_WebSH-e1507715687265

Frank Tindall Commemorative Lecture 2017

Frank Tindall Commemorative Lecture 2017

Thursday 26 October 2017 – 7.00pm

The Human Scale in Architecture and Planning

The lecturer this year is , David Sim, Partner in the firm of Gehl, Architects, based in Copenhagen, and engaged in urban regeneration projects throughout the world.

Free for members, guests by donation- places are limited and must be booked in advance at:

Karen Stevenson, Hon Secretary : HADAS, info@hadas-el.org.uk,01620 825340

gifford pic 2

Gifford Village Design Statement

In 2004, Hadas asked Ian arnott and Andrew Gilmore, long time residents in Gifford and members of the Hadas committee to prepare a document that would provide an account and statement of significance of the history and townscape of Gifford. A first draft was prepared in 2005 and finally published as the Gifford Village Design Statement (GVDS) in 2014.

The aim was to document what villagers loved and cherished about their village and to identify qualities that should be protected. The GVDS was prepared with details that would ensure people living in Gifford had a stronger voice in the planning process and to support and reinforce the role of the Community Council when consulted by the Local Planning Authority about changes and proposals.

The inclusion of information about the statutory process is intended to enable villagers to respond in an informed way to planning and development proposals in Gifford; reflecting the Scottish Governments wish to encourage community engagement in the planning system.

Launch of the Gifford Village Design Statement (L-R, Andrew Gilmore, Karen Stevenson, Ian Arnott)
vision-1

Haddington Town Centre Vision Project

Download the Vision Documents
Haddington vision main document 1
Haddington vision assets and markets appendix 2
Haddington vision consultation appendix 3
Haddington vision places and spaces appendix 4

With a struggling town centre, Hadas brought together the key organisations in the town to form the Haddington Town Centre Vision Committee, led by our chairman Andrew Robinson. The Committee appointed consultants, Urban Animation, to undertake a study. Hadas was joined by the Community Council, Business Association, History Society and Knox Academy. Funding from all of these organisations was supported by generous donations from Hadas members and individuals along with East Lothian Council.

The Vision Report, A Vision for Haddington Town Centre, fulfilling our potential, launched in 2012, was ‘prepared with the help and enthusiasm of a huge number of people and organisations in and around Haddington. The Vision is rooted in their aspirations and enthusiasm for the place that they love’ (Urban Animation report).

The Haddington Town Centre Vision Project is a good example of people working together for the good of their town. The Vision sets out how the town can build on its strengths:

• East Lothian’s Hub-its role as East Lothian’s hub for residents and visitors
• Telling the Story-its unique story as one of Scotland’s oldest towns
• A Special Place-its abundance of attractive buildings, streets and spaces, including the River Tyne
• A Creative and enterprising future-its enterprising and creative people, not least the younger generation
• Collective responsibility-its well establishes community spirit

The vision sets out a challenge to the town to ensure that everything anyone does should support the overriding ambition ‘to animate Haddington Town Centre, generate more activity and increase footfall’.

Clear priorities were established and set out as 8 key actions, that offer transformational benefits for the long term future of Haddington.

1. The best town square in Scotland?
2. Getting About: an access strategy for Haddington Town Centre
3. Re-use empty buildings
4. telling the world: marketing Haddington Town Centre
5. Get Local
6. Enterprising Youth

Hadas continues to support and champion these ambitions and helped and supported the creation of the Haddington Community Development Trust, where it continues to have a presence on the board.

Haddington Festival

Since 1997 Hadas and its members have contributed to the Haddington Festival.

In 1997 photographs past and present were presented for an exhibition ‘Haddington Remembered’ which was organised by Neil Fraser.

Nigel Tranter gave a talk to co-incide with the Festival in 1998 along with an exhibition about the work of Hadas.

Roger Kirby, Ian Arnott and Bob Heath organised a Haddington Town Trail quiz for a number of years in 1998, 2000, 2001 and again in 2005, enjoyed by many of the towns residents.

In 2002 a painting competition was organised with the local schools by Neil Fraser, Bob Heath, Sheena Richardson. The lovely illustrations were compiled into a desk calendar which was printed and sold at following festivals and events.

In 2007 Roger Kirby, Bill Rarity and Helen Robertson from the committee prepared a Haddington Crossword competition.

The Trees of Haddington

Dr Roger Kirby combined his love of trees and the environment of Haddington to prepare a booklet ‘The trees of Haddington and District’ in 2001 with the help of funds from a Millennium Lottery Grant. The booklet provides details of the many significant trees in the Burgh which are all documented with supporting location plans.

Restoration of St Marys gates, railings and boundary walls

This first significant project for Hadas, was organised by committee members, Roger Kirby, Bob Heath and Andrew Gilmore. Researching historic plans and records provided the details for the original gate and railing patterns to be copied and reproduced. Coupled with restoration of the stone boundary walls the new wrought iron gates and railings make a fantastic contribution to the setting of St Mary’s.

The project was completed in May 2005 and was made possible with funding from Viridor funding along with grants and donations from The Scottish Executive, Historic Scotland, East Lothian Council, Forward Scotland and many individuals and Hadas members.